The Spaces Between Your Fingers

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I interviewed my grandmother Bonnie Fuller in her home. Wearing a casual outfit of jeans and a sweatshirt, she sat comfortably on her couch in her living room, peering at me through her glasses. She laughs as she tells me the story of when her grandmother taught her and her cousin Linda a lesson. She also uses this story as a testimony to children in her work at church.

It was a special Saturday for six-year-old Bonnie because her Grandmother Hinson decided to take Bonnie, her mother, aunt, sister, and three cousins on a shopping trip. Now, this was a big deal because they hardly ever went to the store because it was far away from the farm.

All eight of them crammed into the car, no seatbelts there to limit the amount that piled in. Grandma Hinson was a large, independent lady who drove with both of her feet, so rides with her were always a bit nerve-racking.

When they arrived at the store Bonnie and her closest cousin, Linda, fell in love with matching red shoulder bags. Inside the purse, there was an assortment of play makeup: lipstick, a compact, rouge, etc. A young girl’s dream.

“Please Grandma, may we get them?” they begged in unison. The spoiled girls were granted their wish and thanked their grandmother profusely with wide smiles on their faces.

On the way home, the girls were still enthralled with their new purchases and were playing with the contents of their purses until an argument broke out.  

“That lipstick belongs in my bag!” Bonnie accused.

“NO! It’s mine!” Linda retorted.

The bickering girls quickly got on their grandmother’s nerves and she told them to stop arguing over nonsense. The cousins continued, each girl sure that she was the owners of the plastic, red lipstick. Their grandmother warned them one more time with no success until she threatened them,

“I’ll put you out of this car and leave you two to find your way home yourselves!”

The girls, in disbelief of the threat, ignored her and continued on. Suddenly, the no-nonsense woman slammed on the breaks and told them to get out. Bonnie, wide-eyed, looked at her wiser seven-year-old cousin, Linda, who then exclaimed,

“Fine! I know how to get home!” and then exited the car. Bonnie followed her. Their grandmother drove down the hill and around the bend of the brand-new mountain road, no longer in sight. The girls then looked around at the dense trees surrounding them and realized that there were no houses around. They continued slowly walking down the lonely country lane until the weight of the situation they were in began to really set in.  

Bonnie, scared, asks her older cousin,

“Are you sure you know where you’re going? Nobody is here to help us!”

Linda, her confidence now being questioned, suddenly remembers and shares,

“You know, some man came to see my dad last week and said he saw a bear.”

The girls both stop walking and look at each other to scream. Then, with the image of a grizzly chasing them in their minds, they bolted down the road in the direction that the car drove away. As they turned around the bend they catch sight of their grandmother’s car parked with her in it waiting and laughing at them.

That was the last time they ever argued in Grandmother Hinson’s car. 

Stranded

Flag as Inappropriate
1954
Pennsylvania

I interviewed my grandmother Bonnie Fuller in her home. Wearing a casual outfit of jeans and a sweatshirt, she sat comfortably on her couch in her living room, peering at me through her glasses. She laughs as she tells me the story of when her grandmother taught her and her cousin Linda a lesson. She also uses this story as a testimony to children in her work at church.

Decade: 1950s
Rating:
Recorded by Rowyn Nallo on December 10, 2017
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