The Spaces Between Your Fingers

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Context:<br />
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I interviewed my dad, Matthew Karp, who originally lived in Saugus, California. When asked about his first job ever, he told me about being a paperboy in great detail. It was interesting to hear how vivid his description of this time was compared to things later in his life which had lesser detail. Although it violated many laws about employing children, the adversity of being a paperboy gave him an introduction to the feeling of earning money that was your own to spend, and the idea of independence.<br />
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Matt’s eyes open as a small blue layer of light fills the room. Looking out the window reveals multiple layers of colors on the horizon, a hint of orange telling the city of Saugus, California that the sun is approaching. The stars, still visible, begin to fade along with that thin blue and white layer the moon was busy emitting. The 12 year old boy emerges from his bed, wiping his eyes, and journeying to his toothbrush, saluting to the squadrons of army men lined up and ready for action along his wooden bedroom floor.

    He creaks the front door open, doing his best, to avoid another grunt from his parents’ room. A gorgeous sky greets him, slowly waking up with him as he reaches for his two year old bike, hoping to be replaced once his special safe was full to the brim. Munching on his Cheerios and realizing he should’ve worn his yellow jacket that mom gave him, he heads to the distribution center. Soon the smell of the morning, and the sound of birds chirping is replaced by bike gears shifting, and bells ringing, as Matt is joined by three more riders. He lifts his hand up, and his fellow army men-enthusiast, 11-year old Mikey, does the same. The quad now heads down Newberry St. towards the center of town, all too tired for bike tricks or conversation.

    “Karp! Come here” barks a scruffy looking man, very large in size, who looks like the kind of guy who’s a lot younger than you think he is. As he leans in closer, the smell of coffee emerges, and a pile of papers lands in Matt’s hands. “You’ve got Cedar Falls today. I wanna hear good things.” “Thank you, sir” Matt responds, trembling in the cold shade next to the stand while the excitement of finally getting Cedar Falls warms him up. He grabs the pile of papers and, using all of his energy, sets it next to his little bike, wondering if his bike will hold all of the paper or if he’s going to need Band-Aids again. As Matt begins to roll the paper, a high pitched voice interrupts him,

“Hey Matt, I heawd you got Cedew Falls.”

“Oh, hey Mikey”

Mikey was one of the youngest workers here. He was kind of burly with blue eyes and was always looking up to Matt.

“Yeah. I have Canterwood today.” he says, solemnly, while twiddling his thumbs.

“Well, that’s okay. Mrs. Greensdale always gives me a dollar every time I get there on time for the dad. Why don’t you take her house on Cedar today”, Matt offers, while gathering the rolled papers and placing them into his bag.

“But that’s pawt of your woute”

“Mikey, don’t worry about it.”

“Wow, thanks Matt!” Mikey’s eyes light up as he props his bike up and pedals away.

Matt grabs the bag full of today’s paper and lifts the bag over his handlebars. As he begins to pedal, ever leaning right and left to balance the weight of the enormous bag, the calm and gentle sun rises over the mountains, telling him it’s gonna be okay, telling him it’s time to get to work. The people need their news.

    

    

The Route

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Context:

I interviewed my dad, Matthew Karp, who originally lived in Saugus, California. When asked about his first job ever, he told me about being a paperboy in great detail. It was interesting to hear how vivid his description of this time was compared to things later in his life which had lesser detail. Although it violated many laws about employing children, the adversity of being a paperboy gave him an introduction to the feeling of earning money that was your own to spend, and the idea of independence.

Rating:
Recorded by Ben Karp on June 5, 2019
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