The Spaces Between Your Fingers

Click the image to flip

Flip
I interviewed Kara Goodchild, My mother, at her home in Wayne PA. She was in her pajamas laying in bed with her daughter, my sister Eliza, and one of the dogs when I called. She recalled three key memories, her move from Minnesota, a moment during her first pregnancy, and moments that bring her the most pride in life. When Kara was  in fifth grade she moved from Minnesota to Pennsylvania after her father was given a promotion. Though the move was jarring to the family, they settled in jsut fine. Louise, the mother, joined the PTA and played tennis to make friends. Kirsten found new friends and settled in to life in PA before going to Texas for college. Things would never be the same for Kara, but they would get better. She started riding competitively, something she had never done in Minnesota but always wanted to do. She later became a cheerleader for Radnor Highschool.

The snow came down in sheets, streaking past the car as it rumbled down the highway. “Do we have to go?” Kirsten called out next to Kara. “All of my friends are here, Dad, is this really that important?” Kara wondered if her sister had a point, she was only in 5th grade, but she too was leaving her friends behind.

“Things will be different.” Answered their mother. She leaned back from the front seat, silhouetted in the wintry night, “but I promise you’ll find new friends.” she continued tenderly brushing Kirsten’s hair. .Was that really true though? Mom was giving up her first job since becoming a mother in this move, how would she fare without a reason to leave the house.

              “My father didn’t have anything when he came from Sweden.” Dad began, winding a tale to ease his daughters, “and he found a life here worth every minute of struggle he endured on his way. Things were different but that’s part of what made it special. He didn’t waste an opportunity, even if it meant leaving everything he knew.” He babbled on, adding some bad jokes with appropriately boisterous laughter as he detailed their grandfather’s pilgrimage.

              Soon enough Kara and Kirsten saw the airport looming in the distance. When they had arrived, they begrudgingly followed their parents though the terminals to board the plane. Each step took Kara further and further from the familiar world of snowmobiles and ice skating, and towards the foreign land of Philadelphia. As the plane took off she turned from the window and slumped in her seat, closing her eyes and shutting out the cold sterile cabin.

              “Get up honey.” Mom cooed as she raised Kara from her torpor. “We’re here.” Kara fell in line behind Kirsten and collected her bags. Again, they marched to the car and piled in. This was not the familiar car of home, the lights on the dash were alien and it reeked of foreign odors. Dad fiddled with the keys and muttered curses as he wrestled with this new vehicle. The car coughed to life and the family was finally free of the airport.

              The Pennsylvania sky was alive with snowflakes, just like home. The soft white powder danced through the headlights of the car as they sped down the highway and towards suburbia. Kara drifted back towards sleep, comfortable in the familiar weather. In the depths of the night, the family emerged from the car and Kara dragged herself up the stairs and into her new room. She ignored the plain walls, turned away from the snow-lined window, and wrapped herself in the heavy blanket. In the morning she rose with the sun streaming in through her window. Kara yawned and looked out her window, the snow was gone. The grass glistened in the warm morning. This would be nothing like the world she knew.

The Point of Inflection

Flag as Inappropriate
1979
Minnesota

I interviewed Kara Goodchild, My mother, at her home in Wayne PA. She was in her pajamas laying in bed with her daughter, my sister Eliza, and one of the dogs when I called. She recalled three key memories, her move from Minnesota, a moment during her first pregnancy, and moments that bring her the most pride in life. When Kara was in fifth grade she moved from Minnesota to Pennsylvania after her father was given a promotion. Though the move was jarring to the family, they settled in jsut fine. Louise, the mother, joined the PTA and played tennis to make friends. Kirsten found new friends and settled in to life in PA before going to Texas for college. Things would never be the same for Kara, but they would get better. She started riding competitively, something she had never done in Minnesota but always wanted to do. She later became a cheerleader for Radnor Highschool.

Decade: 1970s
Rating:
Recorded by Owen Goodchild on March 11, 2020
×
×
4
×
Alert IconAre you sure you want to permanently delete this postcard? You cannot undo this action. Delete
×